Neon, Fuel, Pavement and Americana on Route 66: A Photographic Series

For 13 days, I drove across Route 66 armed with my camera and laptop to record the whole adventure.

Neon, Fuel, Pavement and Americana on Route 66, chronicles the people, places, gas stations, kitschy roadside attractions and feeling of having stepped into a time machine that made it the most memorable road trip of my life.

The Route 66 logo is painted on this segment of classic road near Essex, California
The Route 66 logo is painted on this segment of classic road near Essex, California

Bright and vibrant signs adorn the sides of the majority of Route 66 across America, like this one for the Desert Hills Motel in Tulsa, Oklahoma

The Desert Hills Motel on Route 66 in Tulsa, Oklahoma
The Desert Hills Motel on Route 66 in Tulsa, Oklahoma

On a lonely stretch of the highway in Amarillo, Texas, 10 brightly spray-painted Cadillacs stand tall in the desert at a Route 66 hotspot known as Cadillac Ranch.

Cadillac Ranch, Amarillo, Texas
Cadillac Ranch, Amarillo, Texas

Located in Lebanon Missouri, the historic Munger Moss Motel still looks and feels just as it did during the heyday of Route 66.

I truly enjoyed my evening there, even if I did have an unfortunate run-in with bedbugs.

The famous Route 66 Munger Moss Motel in Lebanon, Missouri
The famous Route 66 Munger Moss Motel in Lebanon, Missouri

For one night, I actually slept in one of these cement wigwams at the Wigwam Motel in Holbrook, Arizona.

The motel is a part of a once-mighty chain that now only has a few links remaining, one of which I also came across just outside Hollywood, California.

Cement wigwams for rent at the Wigwam Motel, Holbrook, Arizona
Cement wigwams for rent at the Wigwam Motel, Holbrook, Arizona

By far one of my favorite stops on Route 66, the Catoosa Blue Whale in Oklahoma is a relic of the type of Americana that used to dot the entire drive.

The Blue Wale in Catoosa, Oaklahoma, on Route 66
The Blue Wale in Catoosa, Oaklahoma, on Route 66

Still in operation, Roy’s Cafe, Motel and Gas Station is the only stop for miles in either direction on Route 66 in Amboy, California.

Roy's Cafe, Amboy, California
Roy’s Cafe, Amboy, California

The motel may be shut down, but the Dr. Pepper soda machine in Tucumcari, New Mexico, still offers the promise of a quenched thirst.

Tucumcari, New Mexico_18
Tucumcari, New Mexico_18

Classic Route 66 remnants sit just outside the Totem Pole Trading Post in Rolla, Missouri.

Old gas station remnants alongside Route 66
Old gas station remnants alongside Route 66

Pulling off the freeway in New Kirk, New Mexico, I came across this stretch of historic Route 66 at a 4-way intersection.

Historic Route 66 in New Kirk, New Mexico
Historic Route 66 in New Kirk, New Mexico

This might be the least welcoming welcome sign on Route 66.

Located in the ghost town of Two Guns, Arizona, I stopped to take photos and wound up having a conversation with a hobo.

Two Guns Entrance Sign
Two Guns Entrance Sign

Hidden just before a dead-end in Farmersville, Illinois, I was fortunate to stumble across Art’s Motel and Restaurant at just the right moment of sun and clouds to capture this image.

Art's Motel Restaurant in Illinois
Art’s Motel Restaurant in Illinois

My drive through Kansas on Route 66 was a cloudy one, though that just gave me something different and fun to work with when stopping to photograph this emblem painted on the road.

Route 66 in Kansas
Route 66 in Kansas

The Cool Sprints Service Station in Cool Springs, Arizona, is the last place to get gas before a windy and intense drive up through the mountains to California.

It also was completely destroyed for the movie Universal Soldier and has since been rebuilt and turned into a tourist attraction.

Cool Springs Service Station, Cool Springs, Arizona_02
Cool Springs Service Station, Cool Springs, Arizona_02

  • Wow! I’m really impressed at how you captured all of the colors along Route 66. It makes me want to hop in my car and just drive.

    • Thanks so much Suzy! It really was that colorful…if not moreso.

  • Wow! You have really captured some of the vibrant colors along Route 66. It makes me want to hop in my car and just drive.

  • Love this! I drove parts of Route 66 this summer, and wish I could have driven the whole thing! The little relics of Route 66’s glory days are great. A real part of Americana.

  • MARIO Y LUCIENTES

    AMERICA ART SOUNDS A FUCK.

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